Recommendations

Project Type # Outcome Report Year FEC
Arctic TEEBKey finding2.1Arctic ecosystem services: Systematic conclusions on Arctic ecosystem services and their status and trends cannot yet be made based on the data gathered in the scoping study.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBAdvice2

A number of additional options, some of which address fundamental issues and challenges to the application of the TEEB approach in the Arctic context. 1. Guidance, methods, tools and information to support policy

1.1. Raise awareness of the roles and value of ecosystem services among Arctic communities with the aim of empowering communities, grass roots organizations and local administrations for better discussions/negotiations with sub-national/federal governments and corporations on policy related to Arctic development.

1.2. Through collaborative processes, raise awareness of the ways that Arctic Indigenous Peoples value nature. For example, facilitate discussions between Indigenous Peoples and economists, aimed at informing ways to accommodate indigenous values in economic policies and practices.

1.3. Make the role of natural capital and ecosystem services explicit in relation to adaptation and adaptive capacity. This is best done through bringing results from this scoping study into, and working in collaboration with, Arctic Council initiatives, for example, bya) considering adaptation options for policy makers that include the non-monetary and economic aspects of biodiversity, through the Adaptation Actions for a ChangingArctic (AACA); and b) creating resilience indicators that would encompass ecosystem processes (building on the human development indicators) through the Arctic Resilience Report.

1.4. Make visible (in economies) the wider value of Arctic biodiversity conservation and sustainable biodiversity use schemes, and identify financing opportunities for such schemes that are based on recognizing ecosystem services.

1.5. Apply economic analysis with the goal of a) accommodating the multiple value systems underpinning mixed and livelihood economies in the Arctic, such as reindeer herding and community economies based, or partly based, on subsistence hunting, fishing and gathering; b) capturing Arctic social and ecological resilience in economic information and valuation; and c) facilitating investment in the insurance value of Arctic natural capital.

2. Knowledge base.

2.1. Complete and maintain the Arctic Ecosystem Services Inventory. A draft ecosystem services inventory was prepared as part of the scoping study (see Ecosystem services section above). The inventory is a start on a structured and synthesized literature review of Arctic ecosystem services, the ecosystems they are derived from, their associated benefits, status, trends, threats, uncertainty, knowledge gaps, and what work has been done on valuation. To be a useful source of synthesized information, and a basis for further information tools, the inventory requires further work. The inventory could a) be a ready resource for information and overviews of available information on ecosystem services and what is known about them in relation to beneficiaries, threats, trends and valuation, both to raise awareness and to provide an entry point for policy-related assessment work; b) serve as a metadata center and service through CAFF’s Arctic Biodiversity Data Service; and c) provide input to research and monitoring plans and agendas, and potentially also to industry monitoring and research planning

2.2. Take steps to capture or present new research results in ways that make them useful to ecosystem-services-based policy development. This could be awareness raising through research meetings of the need to make this connection, increased expert networking, such as through a community of practice on ecosystem services, and/or through changes to funding mechanisms for research.

2.3. Clearly identify knowledge gaps (both at the broad underpinning and methodological scale, and for specific geographic scales) and develop mechanisms to bring them into discussion of research agendas.

2.4. Facilitate and coordinate monitoring of the social and economic importance of ecosystems (through the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program). 3. Synthesis, analysis and information products

3.1. Analyze linkages over scale, time and actors that affect when, where and to whom the costs and benefits of industrial development in the Arctic on biodiversity and ecosystems occur, considering also current and future use and spatial subsidies, to demonstrate the value and help frame the distributive impacts of decisions.

3.2. Prepare ecosystem services inventories with regular status reporting. Include interdisciplinary valuation of ecosystem services at the level of LMEs and national scales, but also initiate a regular review and assessment process at the pan-Arctic scale. Review and assessment would be in collaboration with existing Arctic Council processes, including the framework for assessment of biodiversity status and trends established through the CBMP.

3.3. Develop indicators to help describe the status of Arctic biodiversity and ecosystems. Include indicators that convey the proximity to potential thresholds or tipping points and attach confidence metrics to all indicators reflecting the level of knowledge and understanding. Development of such indicators needs to be done through co-production of knowledge based on a collaboration of Traditional Knowledge holders and scientists. (Indicator development is underway through the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program.)

3.4. Develop resilience indicators that make explicit the role of natural capital and ecosystem services in building of adaptive capacity. These would have similar use for policy making but be more encompassing of ecosystem processes than human development indicators.

3.5. Develop and test tools to evaluate Arctic ecosystem services in local and sub-national EBM, marine spatial planning, land-use planning and management, and in co-management schemes where they can directly contribute to co-producing knowledge and adaptive governance.

The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding4.4Valuing Arctic ecosystem services: Key Finding 4.4. Health values are often overlooked in ecosystem services analysesThe Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding3.7Governance: Key Finding 3.7. The Arctic Council, as a leader in bringing together knowledge across the circumpolar North, has an important role to play for further work on Arctic ecosystem services. These ecosystem services are recognized through the values assigned to them from the perspectives of key Arctic stakeholders and rights holders.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding3.2Governance: Key Finding 3.2. Recognizing Arctic ecosystem services and capturing them in decision-making processes can strengthen the resilience of Arctic social-ecological systems to rapid changes in the region.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding2.3Arctic ecosystem services: Although syntheses, guidelines and analyses of policy options at the pan-Arctic scale can raise the profile of ecosystem services and provide direction, work on ecosystem services is most effective when it builds on analysis at smaller scales.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding6.1Way forward: Engagement of Arctic Indigenous organizations and a broad range of stakeholders in participatory development of knowledge and policy alternatives is central to a successful TEEB Arctic study. Follow-up work to this scoping study should be structured so that those who wish to contribute can do so through a range of avenues.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding4.1Valuing Arctic ecosystem services: Key Finding 4.1. The ecosystem services link is crucial when striving for sustainable management of complex social-ecological systems, and valuation in this context can provide powerful information for evaluating alternative management strategies. Cohesive, integrated and commonly accepted frameworks for assessment of the values of Arctic ecosystems are needed.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding3.4Governance: Key Finding 3.4. Recognizing, demonstrating and capturing the diverse values of ecosystem services in policy instruments for strategic planning and integrated management of natural resources and space can help reconcile biodiversity conservation with development.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding2.5Arctic ecosystem services: Reduction of greenhouse gases remains a top priority for conserving ecosystem services.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding1.1Arctic ecosystem services: Featuring ecosystem services in policy development and implementation is needed to help define and balance societal needs and priorities in the rapidly changing Arctic policy landscape.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBAdvice1A TEEB Arctic study, or set of studies, based on two to five policy areas. The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding4.3Valuing Arctic ecosystem services: Key Finding 4.3. There is a persistent risk that social and cultural attributes of ecosystem services are neglected while the monetized economic benefits and ecological causes of ecosystem service change are over-emphasized.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding3.6Governance: Key Finding 3.6. Mainstreaming of nature’s values by means of ecosystem services requires adjustments to existing policies and instruments as well as the development of new ones.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding3.1Governance: Key Finding 3.1. Incorporation of Arctic ecosystem services into policies and governance practices is akey method for the integration of environmental, economic, and social policies.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding2.2Arctic ecosystem services: Ecosystem services work should take a holistic approach and operate at the level of ecosystem service bundlesThe Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding5.1Policy focus: Key Finding 5.1. Policy related to increasing and changing development patterns in the Arctic wouldbenefit from incorporation of consideration of ecosystem services. Participants in this scoping projectidentified a list of policy areas for further consideration, and two of these were assessed as ‘policyexamples’ through a TEEB approach, at a broad scoping level: expanding shipping and oil and gasdevelopment in the marine environment, and industrial development in the North American Arctic.)The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding3.8Governance: Key Finding 3.8. Taking an interdisciplinary approach that combines economic and sociocultural analyses to the benefits people receive from Arctic nature faces a number of challenges and concerns. However, it also offers a complementary approach for communicating to decision makers the importance of nature to people, and a toolkit for evaluating policy options and integrating stewardship into decisions.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding3.3Governance: Key Finding 3.3. The TEEB approach can make the diverse values that people hold for nature visible by assessing and communicating the role of biodiversity and ecosystem services in the economy and to society.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015
Arctic TEEBKey finding2.4Arctic ecosystem services: Arctic ecosystem services provide benefits to a range of stakeholders at various scales, both directly and indirectly – and the stakeholders who benefit from services and those who affect the availability of the same services are not always the same.The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) for the Arctic: A Scoping Study Executive Summary2015