Recommendations

Project Type # Outcome Report Year FEC
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey findingTo interpret changes in population size, there is an increasing need to understand whether these are due to shifts in range, changes in reproductive success or changes in annual survival.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey findingMost estimates derive from total counts of all individuals, 8 populations combine some form of capture-mark-recapture approach (almost exclusively in North America) but 15 populations are based upon expert opinion, mostly in East and Central Asia. Less than half of the estimates for all populations were thought to fall within 10% of the true totals.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey findingThere is a very clear need to establish or expand annual reporting on population size and demographic trends to make such information accessible to decision makers and stakeholders in a timely fashion.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey findingIn North America, population estimates are good; trends are generally of the best quality and most populations are increasing or stable.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey findingThis audit suggests that there are between 39.0 and 39.2 million wild geese in the northern hemisphere belonging to 68 populations of 15 species.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey findingIn Central and Eastern Asia, where the greatest declines are suspected, good population estimates and count data series over sufficient long time horizons to offer a robust basis for generating trends are generally lacking, with the notable exception of excellent count data from Korea and Japan. However, the situation is rapidly improving in China, where count networks and coordination with flyway partners are being established.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey finding“White” geese (Chen) are most numerous (17.2 million individuals of 3 species) and all 6 populations have increased in the last 10 years.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey finding

The most urgent priorities for the future are to

(i) improve our knowledge of population distributions to better inform our definitions of discrete flyway populations;

(ii) implement effective mechanisms to at least periodically measure abundance for all northern hemisphere goose populations to assess trends over time;

(iii) initiate research to identify factors responsible for declining trends in populations of concern, and

(iv) evaluate potential negative effects of overabundant goose populations on habitat and sympatric species.

A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey finding“Grey” geese (Anser) comprise 35 populations of 8.1-8.4 million individuals, of which 15 have declined in the last 10 years, especially in East Asia.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey findingFor this reason we urge wider gathering of age ratio data, and marking programmes to provide annual assessments of reproductive success and survival, particularly amongst populations showing declines.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey findingMost populations showed increasing or stable trends over the last 10 years, but our ability to truly judge these trends is highly variable among populations.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey findingMost European populations are increasing or stable, yet several populations lack effective count coordination networks to generate annual assessments of total population size and trends.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey findingAll but one of the populations number between 1000 and 10 million individuals. Only the Western Palearctic population of the Lesser White-fronted Goose lies on the brink of extinction with just over 100 individuals, and only the midcontinent population of lesser snow geese in North America exceeds 10 million adults.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey findingMany populations with the poorest population information are those which we suspect are showing the greatest declines.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
CBMP Terrestrial Biodiversity MonitoringKey finding“Black” geese (Branta) number c. 13.7 million individuals of 27 populations from 5 species, of which 19 populations show stable or increasing trends over the last 10 years.A Global Audit of the Status and Trends of Arctic And Northern Hemisphere Goose Populations2018
Arctic Biodiversity Assessment (ABA)Action9

Reduce the threat of invasive alien/non-native species to the Arctic by developing and implementing common measures for early detection and reporting, identifying and blocking pathways of introduction,and sharing best practices and techniques for monitoring, eradication and control. This includes supporting international efforts currently underway, for example those of the International Maritime Organization to effectively treat ballast water to clean and treat ship hulls and drilling rigs.

9.1. Develop a strategy for the prevention and management of invasive species across the Arctic, including the identification and mitigation of pathways of introduction invasions. Include involvement of Indigenous observing networks, which include invasive and newspecies reporting, to assist with early detection.

9.2. Incorporate common protocols for early detection and reporting of non-native invasive species in the Arctic into CBMP monitoring plans.

Actions for Arctic Biodiversity, 2013-2021: Implementing the recommendations of the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment2015
Arctic Biodiversity Assessment (ABA)Action2

Incorporate resilience and adaptation of biodiversity to climate change into plans for development in the Arctic.

2.1. Prepare a reference guide for resource managers on sea-ice-associated biodiversity in times of rapid change (Life Linked to Ice).

2.2. Arctic Resilience Report.

2.3. Prepare three regional assessments with information to assist local decision-makers andstakeholders to develop adaptation tools and strategies to deal with climate change andother environmental stressors and produce an overall integrated report on adaptationactions (Adaptation Actions for a Changing Arctic (AACA) Part C).

2.4. Ensure accessibility of science results relevant to maintaining and increasing resilience ofbiodiversity to climate change through the ABDS and outreach.

2.5. Follow-up on the recommendations of the Life linked to Ice and related research.

Actions for Arctic Biodiversity, 2013-2021: Implementing the recommendations of the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment2015
Arctic Biodiversity Assessment (ABA)Action11

Reduce the threat of pollutants to Arctic biodiversity.

a. Support and enhance international efforts and cooperation to identify, assess and reduce existing and emerging harmful contaminants.

11.1. Provide information necessary for assessment of trends in, among others, contaminant levels in ecosystems, biological effects, and improve predictive capacity (Trends and Effects Monitoring Programme).

11.2. Prepare an update assessment of Persistent Organic Pollutants and resulting biological effects.

11.3. Develop ecosystem models that project ecosystem response to climate change and contaminant-related factors (AACA-C).

b. Support the development of appropriate prevention and clean up measures and technologies that are responsive to oil spills in the Arctic, especially in ice-filled waters, such that they are ready for implementation in advance of major oil and gas developments.

11.4. Implement the Agreement on Cooperation on Marine Oil Pollution, Preparedness andResponse in the Arctic , including executing international exercises and maintaining and updating the Operational Guidelines.

11.5. Prepare a Guide to Oil Spill Response in Snow and Ice Conditions in the Arctic.

c. Encourage local and national action to implement best practices for local wastes, enhance efforts to clean-up legacy contaminated sites and include contaminant reduction and reclamation plans in development projects.

11.6. Demonstrate rapid assessment and clean-up of old sites, and environmentally sounddestruction of obsolete pesticides in northern Russia.

11.7. Organize an information conference on best practices on contaminant reduction in Indigenous communities.

Actions for Arctic Biodiversity, 2013-2021: Implementing the recommendations of the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment2015
Arctic Biodiversity Assessment (ABA)Action4

Require the incorporation of biodiversity objectives and provisions into all Arctic Council work and encourage the same for on-going and future international standards, agreements, plans, operations and/or other tools specific to development in the Arctic. This should include, but not be restricted to, oil and gas development, shipping, fishing, tourism and mining.

4.1. Strengthen and develop new strategic partnerships, particularly with industry, to seek innovative solutions and expand responsibility for taking care of biodiversity.

4.2. Analyse the relationship between CAFF activities and international biodiversity objectives from relevant multilateral environmental agreements as a starting point for improved cooperation.

4.3. Develop a set of biodiversity principles for the Arctic Council, Observers, and stakeholders on incorporating biodiversity objectives and safeguards into their work, apply these principles to the activities of Arctic Council Working Groups and other Subsidiary Bodies, and evaluate the extent to which these activities respond to the ABA recommendations.

4.4. Develop, as needed, binding and/or voluntary agreements/standards that work towards the harmonization of industry-specific and cross-industry standards related to the conservation and/or sustainable use of biodiversity. This should considerhow to encourage the incorporation of biodiversity as a fundamental component of environmental and risk assessment work.

4.5. Provide information, expertise, and recommendations on conservation of Arctic ecosystems to policymakers.

4.6. Develop best practices for vessel-based Arctic marine tourism (Arctic Marine TourismProject- Best Practice Guidelines) (AMSA Recommendation IIIB).

4.7. Make monitoring and research results on species, including those relevant to maintaining and increasing resilience of biodiversity to climate change, accessible to all stakeholders, through the ABDS.

4.8. Strengthen collaboration with industry in Arctic biodiversity monitoring

Actions for Arctic Biodiversity, 2013-2021: Implementing the recommendations of the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment2015
Arctic Biodiversity Assessment (ABA)Action13

Increase and focus inventory, long-term monitoring and research efforts to address key gaps in scientific knowledge identified in this assessment to better facilitate the development and implementation of conservation and management strategies. Areas of particular concern identified through the ABA include components critical to ecosystem functions including important characteristics of invertebrates, microbes, parasites and pathogens.

13.1. Share research gaps and priorities identified in the ABA with the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) third International Conference on Arctic Research Planning to inform their research priorities.

13.2. Complete the Arctic coastal biodiversity monitoring plan and begin implementation.

13.3. Address monitoring and research gaps in scientific knowledge identified as priorities in the ABA and Arctic Biodiversity Congress, including components critical to ecosystem functions including invertebrates, microbes, parasites and pathogens.

13.4. Report on changes in Arctic species, ecosystems, and the effects of stressors through state of Arctic biodiversity reports.

a. Marine species and ecosystems

b. Terrestrial species and ecosystems

c. Freshwater species and ecosystems

d. Coastal species and ecosystems.

13.5. Explore development of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) for the Arctic.

13.6. Develop and update taxonomic lists where there is a gap

a. Red List for Arctic Vascular Plants

b. Moss check list.

13.7. Complete the circumpolar boreal vegetation map.

13.8. Prepare a circumpolar seabird monitoring plan.

Actions for Arctic Biodiversity, 2013-2021: Implementing the recommendations of the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment2015