Recommendations

Project Type # Outcome Report Year FEC
AdviceMainstream biodiversity; build partnerships with a wide range of stakeholders to seek innovative solutions and expand the responsibility for taking care of biodiversity.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
Key finding7Community observations from local and traditional experts have much untapped potential as ‘early warning systems’Project Summary: Bering Sea Sub-Network II2015
AdviceDevelop tools for data sharing so that data collected can be used by a wide range of people engaged in Arctic biodiversity science, policy and management.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
Key finding2Research efforts relevant to indigenous communities should establish partnerships with them and contribute to building their capacity, for example by hiring local residents, and providing training and equipmentProject Summary: Bering Sea Sub-Network II2015
Key findingConservation of biodiversity and of the ecosystem services it provides requires a long-term perspective and sustained actions at many different temporal and spatial scales.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
Key findingThe relationship between biodiversity and climate change is complex. While climate change has been identified as the key stressor of Arctic biodiversity, the degree to which it has a negative impact depends on complex relationships between climate change, other stressors, geography, economics, politics and management regimes.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
AdviceImplement Ecosystem Based Management in marine, terrestrial, freshwater and coastal ecosystems.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
Key finding4Different environmental changes are occurring within different cultural contexts creating diverse impacts; as such adaptive actions need to be based on local realities and prioritiesProject Summary: Bering Sea Sub-Network II2015
AdviceDevelop binding agreements related to the conservation and/or sustainable use of biodiversity.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
Key findingCredible knowledge of all kinds, and from all sources, is welcomed and needed in the Arctic. This includes science, traditional knowledge and co-produced knowledge as well as knowledge from academia, business, government, civil society and communities.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
AdviceInclude biodiversity in national accounting so that the true value of healthy Arctic ecosystems is understood, and the true costs of biodiversity loss are accounted for.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
Key finding6Regulations that impact communities ought to be flexible to allow for adaptation to change and ought to include meaningful local voice through instruments such as co-management to support the food security and sovereignty of indigenous communitiesProject Summary: Bering Sea Sub-Network II2015
AdviceDevelop targets to stimulate actions and against which progress can be measured.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
Key finding1Partnerships that engage indigenous communities, scientists and other organizations in the co-production of knowledge are essential in understanding environmental change and effects on indigenous communities. This knowledge can contribute to more relevant decision-making.Project Summary: Bering Sea Sub-Network II2015
Key findingBiodiversity policy in the Arctic has to reflect the needs of people living in the Arctic, many of whom are indigenous.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
Key findingBiodiversity underpins sustainable development in the Arctic, including economic, social, cultural, and environmental dimensions. Although there is widespread understanding of the importance of economic development for the well-being of Arctic peoples, there is less understanding of the importance of biodiversity for human well-being, including livelihoods, food security and ecosystem services. Economic development in the Arctic should proceed within the constraints of ensuring the long term sustainability of biodiversity and the ecosystem services it provides.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
AdviceMap biodiversity hot spots and biologically and ecologically sensitive areas at a scale appropriate for industry to use in their planning.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
AdviceExpand both the marine and terrestrial protected areas network and monitor its effectiveness at safeguarding biodiversity.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014
Key finding3Observations from those spending much time on the land and sea are necessary in not only understanding local environmental change but also in understanding the effects of environmental changes on human well-being and traditional practicesProject Summary: Bering Sea Sub-Network II2015
Key findingBiodiversity policy in the Arctic has to reflect the needs of people living in the Arctic, many of whom are indigenous.Arctic Biodiversity Congress 2014, Co-Chairs Report2014